You can also get more for your Austro euro in Romania (191 euros), Hungary (169 euros), the Czech Republic (166 euros), Poland (159 euros) and Slovakia (142 euros).

You can also get more for your Austro euro in Romania (191 euros), Hungary (169 euros), the Czech Republic (166 euros), Poland (159 euros) and Slovakia (142 euros).

You can also get more for your Austro euro in Romania (191 euros), Hungary (169 euros), the Czech Republic (166 euros), Poland (159 euros) and Slovakia (142 euros). In Slovenia the purchasing power advantage is still around a quarter (124 euros), in Cyprus just under a fifth (118 euros).

This is where the most expensive holidays are

By far the most expensive holidays are still in the high-price countries Switzerland (73 euros), Denmark (78 euros) and Sweden (88 euros). In Australia (89 euros), Ireland (91 euros), the USA (93 euros), the Netherlands (95 euros), Japan and France (97 euros each) there is a little less for the same money than at home. As much as there is at home in Germany.

Compared to summer 2018

According to Statistics Austria, most of the changes compared to the previous year were very small. Turkey is an exception. With an inflation rate of around 19 percent year-on-year, this recorded a sharp rise in consumer prices, while the Turkish lira fell massively in value (around 29 percent). The euro also fell slightly against other currencies year-on-year. This leads to a higher price level in overseas destinations. For travelers to the USA, the equivalent of 93 euros (May 2018: 99 euros) means a loss of purchasing power because the euro has lost more than 5 percent of its value against the dollar.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Comments

Sign in Connect to Facebook

The comma – necessary evil or friend and helper in written communication? Communication expert and author Pamela Obermaier explains.

News: What function should the comma fulfill, so what is the idea behind it? Pamela Obermaier: The purpose of the comma is to structure a sentence in such a way that it is easy to read, quickly grasped and understandable – unambiguously. Seen in this way, it is a tool to avoid misunderstandings and a service to the reader.

What could be such a misunderstanding if it is set incorrectly or not? A comma is missing in the sentence “Don’t wait!” – the sentence cannot work that way. If you put it in front of the second verb (“Don’t wait, hang!”), That means: The addressee should not wait to hang up a poor drip, but pull it off immediately.best essay helper But if you put the comma after the request (“Wait, don’t hang!”), The sentence gets exactly the opposite meaning: The addressee should wait and not end the life of the convicted person.

© Christian Rudolf Communication expert and author Pamela Obermaier

Fortunately, nobody has been hanged in our country for a long time … To use a realistic example: an Austrian insurance company a missing comma of this type cost 1.8 million schillings in the 1990s. «Heart attack is insured as a cause of an accident but not as a consequence of an accident» was one sentence in a policy. Since an insured had the bad luck of being hit so hard on the chest by a ball while exercising that he suffered a heart attack, he asked for the sum insured for these alleged cases. But the insurance did not want to pay, said a heart attack was only insured as the cause of the accident, not as a consequence of the accident. The man went to court – and got his right, because the judge immediately recognized that the comma was missing in the sentence in question, which meant that its content was not clear: «Heart attack is insured as a cause of an accident, but not as a consequence of the accident» means the exact opposite of «Heart attack is not insured as a cause of the accident, but as a consequence of the accident.»

«The question is, why is the comma used in Germany?»

Why is the comma in Austria called a comma and not a comma? Surprisingly, the term “Beistrich” does not come from an Austrian, but from a German: The German poet Philipp von Zesen, who lived until 1689, probably wanted to use it to Germanize the ancient Greek term “comma”. The word was used by great writers like Bertolt Brecht and also in older editions of DUDEN. So the question is rather why in Germany and Switzerland the good old comma is now almost consistently called a comma! (smiles)

Since when has the comma actually existed? Has it been used in Middle High German in the German language? Not today’s comma, but its predecessor, the so-called Virgel: These are slashes that were previously used to structure sentences and which were then replaced by commas in this function. Today’s slash (and / or) can only be compared with it to a limited extent. We know points between the words (but not at the end of the sentence) from the 9th century BC, when they were first used. But it was not until the printing press in the 15th century that they were finally incorporated into the typeface. Our punctuation marks used today go back to the Venetian printer Aldus Manutius the Elder (1450 to 1515) – both the full stop and the comma. As far as I know, the point was invented first, but the fact that the point and comma were used as a fixed point should have happened at the same time.

«Little has really been achieved with the spelling reform»

What were the basic ideas of the spelling reform from 1996 onwards? As I understand it, the spelling council wanted to simplify everything back then. In any case, the reform softened the rules because suddenly there were and are so many optional comms. In my experience, however, this means that people either almost no longer use commas – or far too many. Because they don’t remember in which cases there is a selection and where the rule is clear and they obviously think: «Then I can choose anywhere anyway!» In this respect, the shot backfired a bit. Due to the numerous cases in which one may, but not have to, add a comma, it has become confusing and even confusing for the writer. In my in-house trainings and courses, I keep hearing that people want clear rules and not the opportunity to choose.

What has succeeded in the spelling reform? From my point of view, little has really succeeded with the spelling reform: for example the S spelling, which I find consistently logical and simplified. A lot of other things – including the writing of accents – have unfortunately become more complicated.

»Put a comma? Doesn’t look like the Austrians are good at it »

Can the Austrians put commits correctly? If you ask me, the majority are clearly finding it difficult. I don’t know of any study on this topic, but I am confronted with texts every day – regardless of whether it is e-mails, Facebook posts, job applications or company websites: it doesn’t look like we’re particularly good at it . However, our German-speaking neighbors are obviously no different. It is a somewhat difficult undertaking to get commons right.

What is the most common mistake people make? The wrongly placed comma in the greeting at the end of an e-mail: Most of them write “Greetings, Max Mustermann”, although no comma belongs here. With this comma, the whole thing means that greetings go to Max Mustermann, but not from him to the addressee. This is a shortening of the phrase «Greetings from (you) Max Mustermann», and if the «sends» – as usual – is left out, it is not replaced by a comma. If you find it visually strange to leave out the usual comma, although the line break creates a space, you can put a call sign instead of the wrong comma («Greetings! Max Mustermann») – then it is also clear and correct.

Were the Austrians able to put commits correctly before the reform? This is difficult to answer because, before the reform, one had much less insight into the texts of others: in school, when the German homework came back, one saw who was good at it; if you have also maintained a pen friendship, you have gained insights into the ability to use commas, but that’s about it. Nowadays there is a lot more public texts due to the Internet – suddenly we can see in WhatsApp, in an email, on Twitter or Facebook whether someone can do that or not. My overall impression: Those who were stable before the reform are having a bit of a difficult time today, but are basically still good at it. Those who were bad at it before the reform are still bad today.

Which rule causes the biggest problems, what do most complain about? For many, the most difficult thing is the extensive rules surrounding infinitive groups. The main complaints are the exceptions within the rules and the changes since the reform.

Who will book you as an in-house trainer, who will come to you for the courses – and why? I am booked by companies whose marketing managers recognize the importance of spelling and good texts. Most of the time they send text professionals or colleagues who deal with texts on a daily basis (PR copywriters, editors, marketing people, editors, proofreaders, secretaries) to the training. And people with an affinity for text also come to the courses – but also more and more people who are present on social media platforms and want to be taken seriously there. Their motivation is: You want to appear professional and competent and understand that it is necessary to have a reasonable command of spelling – and also the use of accents.

Information for those interested

The Germanist and expert for success through language effects Mag. Pamela Obermaier holds spelling and comma seminars in her agency textsicher in Purkersdorf (textsicher.at), through which she is booked as an in-house trainer for the entire German-speaking area, and in the Goldegg media academy -Training in Vienna (goldegg-training.com).

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Comments

Sign in Connect to Facebook

The pop singer Vanessa Mai, who took second place in the RTL dance show «» Let’s Dance «» last Friday, married her friend and manager Andreas Ferber on Monday in Mallorca.

The wedding was «» a very moving moment «», said 25-year-old Vanessa Mai of the «» Bild «» newspaper. The 33-year-old Andreas Ferber is «» the love of her life «». «» I’m happy that we are now officially husband and wife, «» the pop singer is quoted as saying.

© imago / APress For the last three months Vanessa Mai danced together with Christian Polanc in «» Let’s Dance «»

The TV station RTL accompanied the celebration on Mallorca with a film team. Around 30 guests were invited, including Ferber’s stepmother, pop singer Andrea Berg, and pop titan Dieter Bohlen. «» All the people who are important to us came, «said Ferber on RTL.

On her Facebook page, Mai posted a photo on Monday evening showing her hand with «I said Yes!» «» I said Yes! «» Written on it in black.

Last Friday, the singer took second place in the finale of the RTL dance show «Let’s Dance» behind the musician Gil Ofarim.

© RTL / Stefan Gregorowius Vanessa Mai and Gil OfarimRead news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Comments

Sign in Connect to Facebook

The comma – necessary evil or friend and helper in written communication? Communication expert and author Pamela Obermaier explains.

News: What function should the comma fulfill, so what is the idea behind it? Pamela Obermaier: The purpose of the comma is to structure a sentence in such a way that it is easy to read, quickly grasped and understandable – unambiguously. Seen in this way, it is a tool to avoid misunderstandings and a service to the reader.

What could be such a misunderstanding if it is set incorrectly or not? A comma is missing in the sentence “Don’t wait!” – the sentence cannot work that way. If you put it in front of the second verb (“Don’t wait, hang!”), That means: The addressee should not wait to hang up a poor drip, but pull it off immediately. But if you put the comma after the request (“Wait, don’t hang!”), The sentence gets exactly the opposite meaning: The addressee should wait and not end the life of the convicted person.

© Christian Rudolf Communication expert and author Pamela Obermaier

Fortunately, nobody has been hanged in our country for a long time … To use a realistic example: an Austrian insurance company a missing comma of this type cost 1.8 million schillings in the 1990s. «Heart attack is insured as a cause of an accident but not as a consequence of an accident» was one sentence in a policy. Since an insured had the bad luck of being hit so hard on the chest by a ball while exercising that he suffered a heart attack, he asked for the sum insured for these alleged cases. But the insurance did not want to pay, said a heart attack was only insured as the cause of the accident, not as a consequence of the accident.

por Sid Laymes